Monday Morning Coming Down

All the news that's fit to rant aboutIt's back to work for me, back to news for you.

Ralph ran.

On this day in history:

  • Historians think that the Gutenberg Bible was printed on this day in 1455, launching the previous information revolution.

  • Calvin Coolidge created the FCC in 1927.
  • Chicago gives the Cubs permission to install lights on Wrigley Field for the 1988 season.
  • NBC runs the first network movie without commercial interruption in 1997. 65 million tune in for Schindler's List.

Today's top stories:

  1. Last week's big story is still the top story of the week: a Federal judge in San Francisco has ruled that 321-Studios must stop selling all products that allow copying of commercial DVDs by the end of the week. In the ruling released last Friday, Judge Susan Illston sided with the movie companies saying "Legal downstream use of the copyrighted material by customers is not a defense to the software manufacturer's violation of the provisions" of the DMCA. In other words, the fact that most people used DVDXCopy for legitimate purposes doesn't outweigh the fact that it could be used for illegal purposes. In fact, under the DMCA, the program is illegal, period. 321-Studios will appeal but I'd buy a copy of the program before it's pulled from the shelves. And it's time to write Congress to get them to amend the DMCA.

  2. Just to be fair, Hollywood is also going after actual pirates by suing two Chinese factories that are cranking out bootlegged movies. I wonder if the pirates are using DVDXCopy? Not.
  3. In a related case, Sharman Networks, publishers of Kazaa, argued its case in Australian court Friday. The company is trying to get back computers seized in a raid two weeks ago by the Australian Recording Industry Association. There will be further testimony this week with a decision expected next week. There's no DMCA in Australia but the climate is definitely turning chill down under.

    FBI Anti-Piracy Warning

  4. The FBI has released a new, more dramatic, warning to be attached to movies. The agency will also launch a letter writing campaign to discourage young'uns from swapping music.

  5. The Pentagon just bought a 2132 processor Linux cluster using 3.6 GHz Xeons for the Army Research Laboratory Major Shared Resource Center. The cluster will be used for flow dynamics and computational chemistry projects.
  6. Got Centrino? Intel is launching a major TV and billboard advertising campaign to make you believe you need the Wi-Fi bundle.
  7. More news from the Intel Developers Forum last week. The company demoed a 65 inch LCOS display good enough for HDTV. Intel says the technology could produce inexpensive screens as big as 90 inches. Philips is also manufacturing the chips.
  8. SCO is selling the licenses it claims you need to run Linux. They take Visa, too.
  9. Cable modem growth is slowing, DSL is rising. Cable has 16 million customers, 64% of the market, but analysts say that share will shrink as cable reaches the saturation point and the telcos start offering comparable speeds.
  10. NASA says more people visited its web sites this year than live on the planet Earth - 6.53 billion hits since Rover touched down. Must be some interested Martians.
  11. Einstein was right and The End of the Universe is not nigh, it turns out. Scientists using the doomed Hubble Space Telescope have determined that dark energy will keep the universe from imploding any time soon. Looks like we've got 30 billion years left, give or take a few.